White Papers

July 23, 2014
Ideas for moving Prudhoe Bay's natural gas bounty off Alaska's North Slope are as plentiful as cottonwood seed in the June air. Some are modest: Truck small amounts of gas to Fairbanks consumers. Some are epic: Pipe massive amounts to a Southcentral Alaska liquefied natural gas plant for LNG shipments to Asia — the most expensive North American private-sector construction project ever. Some are...
July 1, 2014
The multibillion-dollar Alaska LNG project aims not only to tap the North Slope's bounty of natural gas, pipe it to tidewater and superchill the vapors into a condensed liquid for export to Asia markets. The project also aims to tap a bounty of public resources: land, wetlands, gravel, lakes and ponds, streams and rivers, possibly even the ocean itself. And to tap them, the project sponsors...
June 24, 2014
By: Stan JonesResearcher/Writer, Office of the Federal Coordinator What is it that brings misery, numb toes and frozen pipes to Alaska residents but warms the hearts of people designing a liquefaction plant? The state's cold weather. Low temperatures would make the natural gas liquefaction process and related systems more energy-efficient for the Alaska LNG project. Higher efficiency and lower...
May 27, 2014
Sixth part in an occasional series on gas projects that could compete for Asian customers with a proposed Alaska LNG export project Two East African nations are serious contenders in the global contest to sell liquefied natural gas to Asia, but like other high-stakes projects proposed in Alaska and elsewhere there are big obstacles and no guarantees. On the upside, the region's proven natural...
April 29, 2014
By Stan Jones The story of LNG shipping is a tale of massive investment, sophisticated technology, engineering wizardry and repeated efforts to tame the ocean's mayhem. All in the pursuit of moving trillions of cubic feet of natural gas worth tens of billions of dollars a year across the seas. It's a fast-growing industry that connects a mix of sellers, buyers, middlemen, financiers and engineers...
April 9, 2014
GOYANG, South Korea - Anxiety is rising in the liquefied natural gas business over the slow rollout of North American LNG export projects. Anxiety about supply. Anxiety about pricing. The worry was simmering at the big Gastech Conference & Exhibition held March 24-27 in Goyang, South Korea, as LNG buyers and sellers fretted that the world's constrained supply could last beyond the next few...
April 8, 2014
The decision to break ground on a liquefied natural gas export project is a momentous move for project sponsors, a multibillion-dollar stake on their futures. Reaching what the industry calls a "final investment decision" — the golden milestone signaling that steel can be ordered, workers hired and construction can begin — takes time, money and tight coordination between multiple...
February 19, 2014
Well before big money gets committed to construct a liquefied natural gas export project, sponsors typically spend years studying such questions as: Should this project get built? Does it make business sense? And, as the analysis progresses: Does this project continue to make sense? The proposed $45 billion to $65 billion Alaska LNG export project is going through that process now. It's the up-...
January 29, 2014
The plans called for a new liquefied natural gas plant along the industrial strip at Nikiski, Alaska. Teams of scientists sampled soils, measured historic tsunamis, unfurled maps of seismic faults and described how to place a pipeline across Alaska's roiling Cook Inlet to feed the export plant with natural gas. Engineers detailed how to build an LNG plant and dock safely, and calculated...
January 22, 2014
In their quest to lock up supplies of liquefied natural gas for years to come, key Japanese utilities have signed on as small sponsors of big LNG ventures. Tokyo Gas, Chubu Electric and other companies that heat and power the world's third-largest economy are less content these days to simply contract with the latest LNG mega-project and wait for the first cargo to pull into port. Instead, they...
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