White Papers

March 4, 2015
Alaska LNG project sponsors often remind people it's really three projects — a gas treatment plant on the North Slope, a long pipeline bisecting the state and a liquefaction plant at coastal Nikiski. Each would cost billions of dollars, and need tons of steel, thousands of workers and years to construct. But the middle segment of this trinity — the 800-mile natural gas pipeline...
February 10, 2015
Sometime in the mid-2020s, the grand strategy for how to produce Alaska's great Prudhoe Bay oil and gas field — send the crude oil and other liquids to market; reinject the natural gas — will be primed to pivot. That's because gas reinjection, which has proved spectacularly successful in pushing more oil from Prudhoe, will be losing part of its oomph roughly 50 years after that June...
January 21, 2015
Ideas for moving Prudhoe Bay's natural gas bounty off Alaska's North Slope are as plentiful as cottonwood seed in the June air. Some are modest: Deliver small amounts of gas to Fairbanks consumers. Some are epic: Pipe massive amounts to a Southcentral Alaska liquefied natural gas plant for LNG shipments to Asia — the most expensive North American private-sector construction project ever. Some are...
October 21, 2014
By: Jeannette LeeResearcher/Writer, Office of the Federal Coordinatorjlee@arcticgas.govArmed with bug dope and bear spray, field crews hired by Alaska LNG spent their second consecutive summer making detailed records of soils, archaeology and other basic data needed for permitting and building a proposed multibillion-dollar liquefied natural gas project. Alaska LNG plans to use the information in...
September 10, 2014
By: Jeannette LeeResearcher/Writer, Office of the Federal Coordinator The multibillion-dollar natural gas project proposed for Alaska looks similar to the oil pipeline built almost 40 years ago: Extract a hydrocarbon from the North Slope and send it through an 800-mile pipeline to a year-round port, then pour it into ships to take the product to market. But comparing the two commodities is like...
August 13, 2014
Alaska North Slope gas exported to Asia could hold a key attraction over other U.S. LNG exports: The Alaska gas would burn hotter. To adopt the gas industry's jargon, Alaska's liquefied natural gas would be somewhat "wet" or "rich" compared with the "dry" or "lean" gas other U.S. liquefaction plants will process into LNG. And many Asian buyers love wet gas — which is laced with gas liquids...
July 1, 2014
The multibillion-dollar Alaska LNG project aims not only to tap the North Slope's bounty of natural gas, pipe it to tidewater and superchill the vapors into a condensed liquid for export to Asia markets. The project also aims to tap a bounty of public resources: land, wetlands, gravel, lakes and ponds, streams and rivers, possibly even the ocean itself. And to tap them, the project sponsors...
June 24, 2014
By: Stan JonesResearcher/Writer, Office of the Federal Coordinator What is it that brings misery, numb toes and frozen pipes to Alaska residents but warms the hearts of people designing a liquefaction plant? The state's cold weather. Low temperatures would make the natural gas liquefaction process and related systems more energy-efficient for the Alaska LNG project. Higher efficiency and lower...
May 27, 2014
By: Jeannette LeeResearcher/Writer, Office of the Federal Coordinator Sixth part in an occasional series on gas projects that could compete for Asian customers with a proposed Alaska LNG export project Two East African nations are serious contenders in the global contest to sell liquefied natural gas to Asia, but like other high-stakes projects proposed in Alaska and elsewhere there are big...
April 29, 2014
By Stan Jones The story of LNG shipping is a tale of massive investment, sophisticated technology, engineering wizardry and repeated efforts to tame the ocean's mayhem. All in the pursuit of moving trillions of cubic feet of natural gas worth tens of billions of dollars a year across the seas. It's a fast-growing industry that connects a mix of sellers, buyers, middlemen, financiers and engineers...
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